Wednesday, July 16, 2014

(Source: questionall)

Monday, July 14, 2014
Start ignoring people who threaten your joy.
Literally, ignore them.
Say nothing.
Don’t invite any parts of them into your space.
Alex Elle (via textposter)

(Source: alexandraelle)

Thursday, May 15, 2014

hydrogeneportfolio:

Minimal Posters - Six Women Who Changed Science. And The World.

Monday, May 12, 2014
humansofnewyork:

"What do you want to be when you grow up?""A mom.""What’s going to be the hardest part about being a mom?""Bath time."

humansofnewyork:

"What do you want to be when you grow up?"
"A mom."
"What’s going to be the hardest part about being a mom?"
"Bath time."

Friday, November 15, 2013

Inner-City Wizard School

(Source: vimeo.com)

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

lolsofunny:

welcome to tumblr (part 2)

(Source: perks-of-being-chinese)

Friday, June 21, 2013

odditiesoflife:

Abandoned Places Everywhere

From around the world, some of the most beautiful and enchanting abandoned locations:

  • Holland Island in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, US
  • The Kerry Way Walking Path, Ireland
  • Craco, Italy
  • Blade Mill, France
  • Czestochowa Train Depot, Poland
  • North Brother Island, New York, US
  • Bodiam Castle, East Sussex, England
  • 19th Century Mill, Sorrento, Italy

It turns out procrastination is not typically a function of laziness, apathy or work ethic as it is often regarded to be. It’s a neurotic self-defense behavior that develops to protect a person’s sense of self-worth.

You see, procrastinators tend to be people who have, for whatever reason, developed to perceive an unusually strong association between their performance and their value as a person. This makes failure or criticism disproportionately painful, which leads naturally to hesitancy when it comes to the prospect of doing anything that reflects their ability — which is pretty much everything.

But in real life, you can’t avoid doing things. We have to earn a living, do our taxes, have difficult conversations sometimes. Human life requires confronting uncertainty and risk, so pressure mounts. Procrastination gives a person a temporary hit of relief from this pressure of “having to do” things, which is a self-rewarding behavior. So it continues and becomes the normal way to respond to these pressures.

Particularly prone to serious procrastination problems are children who grew up with unusually high expectations placed on them. Their older siblings may have been high achievers, leaving big shoes to fill, or their parents may have had neurotic and inhuman expectations of their own, or else they exhibited exceptional talents early on, and thereafter “average” performances were met with concern and suspicion from parents and teachers.

David Cain, “Procrastination Is Not Laziness” (via pawneeparksdepartment)

I also find that if it’s something that is very challenging to my introvert nature (for instance, making a phone call to a stranger like for a doctor’s appointment), I procrastinate like crazy because I’m terrified to do it.  It takes me days to build up the courage to do it. (via wolfshowl)

(Source: error4583324)

Monday, April 15, 2013

jtotheizzoe:

mind-heart:

This is my current little project I’ve got going on, I have a huge list of scientists of various disciplines I’m slowly getting through and putting up on my Redbubble store. When I’ve finished my list I’ll start making sets to sell, but for now they are just available individually on tshirts.

I like the style of these, but there’s something about scientists with no eyes  that makes me picture a very peculiar Doctor Who storyline.